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Archive for Search Engine Optimisation’ Category

4

Dec
2019
Comments Off on November Search Queries

November Search Queries

If you want traffic, giving away free stuff / vouchers is a good place to start.

If you want good quality / profitable traffic then, maybe not so much…

Search Queries From Google Search Console For November 2019

It’s also worth taking note of the fact that a lot of people still Think of ‘Google Ads’ as ‘AdWords’ or ‘Google AdWords’.

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18

Sep
2015

SEO Is Dead

I know this is the least original headline in the entire world, but I couldn’t resist using it.

Here is a screen shot of a recent search I did from my Android phone. Not only are organic results below the fold but so are the Google Local / My Business results as well!

local-android-search-google-sept-2015

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9

Apr
2015

Keyword Research with Google Adwords

There’s a whole host of keyword tools, and you could spend hours and hours testing these to see whether there is enough traffic to justify your choice of keywords.

Anytime I’m trying to get an idea of potential traffic for a new client, rather than using Wordtracker, Google’s keyword suggestion tool or other keyword tools that can be unreliable and sometimes there’s not enough data for small regions like Northern Ireland, I just nip into my Google Adwords account, create a new campaign, budget some money, add the keywords, run a couple of ads and set the campaign live.

Over a couple of days to a week, this can quickly give me a more accurate idea of traffic levels. It’s real information, real impressions, and I get to find out how much the clicks actually cost.

I can then use this information as a factor in deciding which keywords to target and which are priorities. It’s helpful both for SEO and Google Adwords, and if a client wants to run a PPC campaign I can export the campaign I’ve set up into a new account.

Michael Wall is an experienced SEO & Google Adwords specialist with over 14yrs and 10yrs respectively. He enjoys all things related to search, helping clients and runs CodefixerSoftware.

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5

Mar
2015

12 Deadly Google Analytics Mistakes To Avoid

1. Not Installing Google Analytics

The biggest mistake is not installing it in the first place. It’s free so why not use it. If you have a comparable piece of software that’s fine, though odds are it’s alot more expensive. If you have any suggestions as alternatives leave a comment at the bottom.

2. Not Monitoring the Reports

Another mistake is having it installed and just ignoring the information and doing everything on a whim. No one pays attention to the information and all website development, updates and changes are made without even looking at the information and what it tells you. You might just delete a page or section of the site that users found engaging and that was driving plenty of conversions.

3. Not Owning Your Analytics Account

I see this all the time. The Google Analytics account belongs to the web agency, and they’ve set your analytics login under their account where all their 100’s of client accounts reside. You have no admin details and just user read and analyse access. Someday you’ll not be able to get hold of the web agency, they’ll be gone. There’ll not be much you can do and all the years of historical data may be lost.

You should own your Google Analytics account and have full admin rights to your account. Web agencies should create an individual account for each client.

4. Not filtering out IP addresses or test pages

Make sure if the web developer is quickly doing an online test, that he filters out testing pages. So if he’s working on a test page default-test.php, make sure that page is excluded, and his 100 tests don’t skew the amount of sessions you’ve had.

Also make sure the IP addresses of your team, your developers or outside agencies are excluded, again so you don’t skew results.

5. Make sure to create a backup View of raw data

When I’m working on sites, I tend to create a number of views. There’ll be a raw view that doesn’t have anything filtered out and collects all the data, and there’ll be a ‘main’ view that has IP addresses and junk spam visitor sessions amongst other things filtered out.

The raw view acts as a backup, should there ever be an issue or mistake with the ‘main’ view.

I think Google now in there wisdom has created a rubbish bin, just in case you delete any views.

6. Don’t forget to set up Goals and Events

Google Analytics set up and running without Goals and Event tracking isn’t meaningless, but it’s certainly not using GA to it’s fullest. You need to identify what’s important to your business and keep track of what people do on the site. For instance tracking sales as a goal conversion, will make it easy to view all sales, where the sales came from, how much you make from the sales, see what the best sellers are and make business decisions based on that information. You may decide to put your best sellers on the homepage or make them more prominent in the category. With ecommerce tracking configured you can easily see all the sales information.

7. Segment Your Data

If you just view all your information in one block, you’ll not be able to differentiate between the different sources of traffic. Use Google Analytics advanced segmentation and compare how different sources of traffic such as traffic from Google Organic, Google Adwords or referrals do. You can also compare mobile, desktop and tablet and judge how users find the experience on different devices.

8. Use Annotations

It’s helpful to know when something on the site was changed. Make use of annotations so it’s easier to track, and it makes it easier to do comparisons. Using Annotations also makes life easier for others who come along, these annotation comments be invaluable as to what was implemented and when.

9. Make use of Custom Alerts

Not setting a custom alert can be an issue if you don’t log into your Google Analytics on a daily or regular basis. There are a number of alerts you can set up so that you get an email notification when a problem arises.

Once such alert can be set if your traffic for a 24hr period is 0.

10. Link Adwords and Webmaster Tools

Make sure you link all your Google Webmaster Tools and Adwords Accounts with your Analytics. This allows you to view the search engine optimization report in Analytics and see what keywords you’re getting traffic on, or you can view some additional metrics in Adwords and see the bounce rate and pages per session on your Adwords traffic.

11. Test To Make Sure Google Analytics is Installed

ScreamingFrog let’s you test all your webpages to make sure that your Google Analytics code is present. There are a number of tutorials on the internet that will show you how to search your site for custom code.

12. Don’t Forget Campaign Tagging For Email marketing and Banner Ads

If you’re not adding tracking code to email marketing and banner ads then it’s very difficult to assess the performance your marketing.

Use Google’s link builder to track campaigns

Michael Wall is an experienced SEO & Google Adwords specialist with over 14yrs and 10yrs respectively. He enjoys all things related to search, helping clients and runs CodefixerSoftware.

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17

Oct
2012

Does Your Site Suffer From Similar Page Titles?

Does your site under perform in Google and you don’t even know it?

Here’s a simple test you can run and find out in seconds.

We’ll run a site operator check through Google to see all pages indexed by Google and if your site comes back with results that look very similar, then you might be killing your site’s traffic.

Here’s how to do a site operator check, go to Google and replace your domain name below:

Before you look at the results here’s what the page titles and meta descriptions are:
The top line is the how Google displays the page title, the 3rd and 4th lines below are what’s called the Meta Description.

Let’s look at the results for a site below. Notice the amount of similar content, the page titles, all look very similar and repetitive.

So what’s the problem?

The problem is that Google wants to pinpoint and serve up the best set of results it can, and if you’ve got identical page titles (which is a major ranking factor) on all your pages then your pages aren’t as specific and relevant as they could be.

Imagine you had a site with 300 products, all with the same page title. You’d be crucifying the amount of traffic you could get to the site. All the product pages should contain unique relevant page titles as well as content.

It wouldn’t make sense to have the same page title on a page about wordpress web design, as it would on a page about pay per click advertising even though they’re on the same site. Every page on your site can be a landing page, an entrance point in from Google, so maximise this.

If your site has a lot pages and you haven’t the time to create unique page titles, then get your web developer to write some code that creates dynamic page titles based on information stored in the database.

How to Keep an Eye on This

You can do a site operate check in Google, but Google also provides help with this. Sign up for a Google Webmaster Tools account , verify your site, and wait until Google crawls your site. You might see something like the image below under the ‘HTML Suggestions’ link and know you’ve things to address:

Meta Descriptions

Meta Descriptions although not a ranking factor, do play a part in encouraging the searcher to click through into your site. Again make these unique and relevant; the better written then the more they’ll entice the searcher into the page. Look at the MoneySupermarket example above, it certainly catches the eye.

So what good does having unique titles do?

Simple answer is, that you can target more keywords in Google and you’ll rank better for these keywords with them in the title.

Having unique pages titles allows you to broaden the range of keywords that your site is targeting. Let’s say you have 4 services that you target, namely SEO, PPC, Google Analytics and WordPress, then by having unique relevant pages titles for these you will naturally improve the performance of each one.

So what about pages such as ‘About Us’ and ‘Contact Us’? These pages tend not to perform particularly well in search engines, so many just use a basic page title of ‘About Us’ or ‘Contact Us’ and without stuffing them full of irrelevant keywords.

Finally

When you’ve sorted your titles out and you’d like to test the benefit, you could run a comparison check in Google Analytics between the current month and a previous month (give it a couple of months for this to kick in) to see if things have been helped. Look to see if your traffic has gone up, are you getting searches now for keywords you didn’t before and take a look at the landing pages report to see if traffic to certain pages has increased.

Article written by Michael Wall. Michael has been working on SEO campaigns for over 10 years. He also runs his own web design company Codefixer Software.

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21

Sep
2012

Digital Marketing Meeting Belfast

A fun time had by all on Tuesday 18th :-

Rand Fishkin is, of course, an SEO guy. What does SEO have to do with PPC? Well not a lot really, but it was a good excuse to get out and have a few pints and a chat with some of the guys and girls involved in all things internet in Belfast / Northern Ireland.*

*Thanks to the organisers of the event – Barry Adams & Kevin McCaffrey.

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29

Mar
2012

Should I Forget About PPC And Concentrate on Search Engine Optimisation (Part 2)?.

Pound Coins

In a previous post about PPC vs SEO. The answer was a resounding ‘NO’.

Just to hammer home the point, here is a summary of some recent research by Google :-

  1. 81% of ad impressions and 66% of ad clicks occur in the absence of an associated organic result on the first page of search results. All ad clicks in these situations are incremental.
  2. On average, for advertisers who appear in the top rank organic slot, 50% of ad clicks are incremental. This means that half of all ad clicks are not replaced by organic clicks when search ads are paused.
  3. For advertisers whose organic search results are in the 2nd to 4th position, 81% of ad clicks are incremental. For advertisers appearing in organic position of 5 or lower, 96% of ad clicks are incremental.

Here’s my summary of their summary:-

  1. AdWords is driving a *lot* of traffic to web sites for keywords where zero traffic would be coming from organic results.
  2. Even if you are the *number 1* organic result for a keyword, you can still get 50% more clicks with by using AdWords as well.
  3. If an SEO company charges you to get onto the first page of Google (position 5 or lower) – the amount of traffic you will get from that organic ranking is pretty much insignificant compared to what you can get from AdWords.*

*Disclaimer – this research was carried out by Google, so it may be slightly biased. But nevertheless, ignore this advice at your peril…

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25

Jul
2011

Should I Forget About PPC And Concentrate on Search Engine Optimisation?

Firstly, don’t listen to Search Engine Optimisation guys/girls who tell you that the number of clicks you will get from Google AdWords / PPC are insignificant compared to the free clicks you will get if you rank well in the organic search results.

A study from Optify concluded that, for more valuable keywords, the organic click-through rate for page 1 placement on Google was 37.3%!

This means that PPC ads can get around 60% of available traffic!

There are many people who would have you believe that you would be lucky to get a Click Through Rate fo 1% for PPC ads. Here are some real world examples from campaigns that I am managing (and the average position on these ads is relatively low):-

Ad1 – approx 44,000 impressions – avg. pos. = 2 – CTR = 14.18%
Ad2 – approx 1 million impressions – avg. pos. = 3.8 – CTR = 6.79%
Ad3 – approx 120,000 impressions – avg. pos. = 6.9 – CTR = 4.52%

Secondly, don’t listen to people (mostly Search Engine Optimisation guys/girls) who tell you that you are paying money for clicks on PPC ads when people would have clicked on your organic result anyway if your ad was not there.

A recent study from Google (OK it is bound to be slightly biased but you can be sure it is not fabricated) showed that “a full 89% of the traffic generated by search ads is not replaced by organic clicks when ads are paused“.

References:

http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1008384
http://googleresearch.blogspot.com/2011/07/studies-show-search-ads-drive-89.html

Update – March 2012 A study from Google found the following:

  • 81% of ad impressions and 66% of ad clicks occur in the absence of an associated organic result on the first page of search results. All ad clicks in these situations are incremental.
  • On average, for advertisers who appear in the top rank organic slot, 50% of ad clicks are incremental. This means that half of all ad clicks are not replaced by organic clicks when search ads are paused.
  • For advertisers whose organic search results are in the 2nd to 4th position, 81% of ad clicks are incremental. For advertisers appearing in organic position of 5 or lower, 96% of ad clicks are incremental.
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2

Dec
2010

Opportunities For The Online Travel Market In The Run Up To Christmas And Beyond…

An interesting article :-

http://googlebarometer.blogspot.com/2010/11/all-you-want-for-christmas.html

For all you SEO type people who reckon that natural search tends to convert better than paid search – there is an interesting line in the article which says :

“Paid search signals purchase intent as those who use sponsored links are 1.5 times more likely
to purchase.”

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